Büchi Labortechnik

Decision Biomarkers Awarded U.S. Patent for Protein Array Surface Chemistry

Date Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2007

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Decision Biomarkers Inc (DBI) has announced the company's PATH® technology has been awarded United States Patent 7,297,497 by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The patent applies to a novel, ultra-thin nitrocellulose surface chemistry that enables the detection of low-abundance proteins. This technology is integrated into DBI's AVANTRA™Q400 Biomarker Workstation, an immunoassay system that enables non-specialized technicians to perform complex protein biomarker analyses in the lab or directly at a clinical trial site.

Protein microarray glass slides utilizing the PATH® technology are also available from life science consumable suppliers to enable researchers to perform ultra sensitive assays including sandwich immunoassays, capture immunoassays, protein profiling, and protein characterization.

"Nitrocellulose has proven to be the protein-assay substrate of choice for decades. With this technology, researchers can use a wide variety of fluorescence probes to make protein assays easier, faster and more sensitive than ever before," said Roger Dowd, CEO and President of DBI. "By delivering a high signal-to-noise ratio and low background fluorescence, we believe the PATH® surface chemistry to be far superior to other commercially available protein-array surfaces."

The AVANTRA™Q400 Biomarker Workstation, DBI's flagship product, is commercially available with various protein biomarker content including "off-the-shelf" multiplex biomarker panels for oncology, immunology, and cardiology, along with custom content defined by the Company's collaborators.

Further Information: http://www.decisionbiomarkers.com/



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